Linari

Project Southern Evia

Athens to Southern Evia

We set off in the afternoon from the center of Athens. There is a ferry that takes you from Agia Marina to Nea Styra. There is also another from Rafina to Marmari, which may save you about 30km , but it costs a lot more.

 

Unfortunately, we wouldn’t  be on time to catch the next ferry, so we decided to go through the National Road and Chalkida to Southern Evia. After reaching Chalkida, the road is a good asphalt, passing through a couple of villages, until you reach Bouros. After Karystos, do not expect to find gas station, supermarket, ATM.

24 hour beach stroll

At Karystos, we fueled up our 4WD van and continued on asphalt, up to Bouros. At that time, the sun was setting and we had no idea of the condition of the gravel road that started at that point, but we decided to continue and find a nice tree on a beach to park under it our van and stay for the night. We knew that Kalamos beach offers that possisbility.

Soon, we realized it would be rather difficult to spot this beach as we had no printed maps, our GPS was not functioning and we had a very hard time even finding the right way, as there was no moon, no light, no civilization, nothing!

I am always pleased with this kind of adventures, being in the safety of Greek rural area, getting lost and trying to find your way with very primitive ways or just by instinct is a challenge accepted for a geographer.

Somehow we passes by the first two beaches Aghious and Kalamos without even knowing it and a few meters later we arrived at a nice open area next to the road and as far as I could understand, next to a beach. After parking, turning off the car lights and getting used to darkness we could understand that we were probably at Kastri. Tired, we cooked some sausages at the gas stove, set up our bed in the van, enjoyed a couple of beers and slept watching a very dark star lighted sky.

Kastri
Kastri

The morning was a very nice surprise. Yes, we were at Kastri and the beach was soooo beautiful and warm at the end of September. Southern Evia is very sparse populated and especially after the end of the summer, you may only meet a few locals, while other campers or tourists are very rare.

Heading back at Kalamos beach was optional but we had to see what we have missed. There were actually a couple of campers on that beach which seems preety nice for free camping. There a few trees offering shadow as the sun will rise from the sea.

Kalamos
Kalamos

A u-turn and we rode to the next beach, Platys Gialos, which we overpassed, without our precious printed maps. So, we arrived at Livadi beach, a huge beautiful, typical Evian beach, but with limited shadowed spots.

Livadi
Livadi

The next one, Potami, could be Livadi’s twin brother. We could say the same for the next one, Linari, but it stands out for its green blue crystal clear waters where we enjoyed a nice swim.

 

Potami
Potami

Access is not easy for a 2WD to any of these beaches, but you should not meet any problem with 4WD.

 

Linari
Linari

Our next destination would be Limnionas or Spilitses, but somebody for some unknown reason had locked a road bar that could not be overpassed. I suppose someone could walk down to the beach, but since I didn’t I cannot say if it’s worth it.

The beach Dipotama is another one missed due to our poorly organized itinerary, but as I always like to think, I have left something behind, so I have to go back and see it.

Evangelismos
Evangelismos

I would not go back though to see Evangelismos and Amygdalia, not because they are not beautiful, but only because they are not more special that the others to my eyes.

Amygdalia
Amygdalia

Cavo D’oro

The sun was about to begin its descending so we decided to try and reach Cavo D’oro for staying overnight.

Cavo D'oro
Cavo D’oro

Cavo D’oro is the most popular cape in Greece, because of the strong winds that blow in that area, the strongest in Greece. Lucky us, the speed was close to 0km/h and the best of circumstances were set to provide us a magnificent sunset.

Balcony over the Aegean Sea
Balcony over the Aegean Sea

As I was saying, Cavo D’oro is the Cape all Greeks hear about in their everyday lives through weather reports, but only a few have been there. It is really a surprise that in order to reach the Cape, you need to drive a really rough gravel road, although the view will definitely pay you back. From the very first moment I saw the Cape I knew that it would become one of my favorite spots to escape from noisy Athens and relax and enjoy it for what it is:

A balcony over the Aegean sea.

Unfortunately, just like everything in Greece that we cannot understand its great value, this area had evidence that it has not been respected by locals who probably think it an convenient place for their herds to shepherd. We didn’t see the herds, but we saw the leftovers. Should we set up a tent would be challenging to find a clean spot. Thankfully we had our van, but things like this disappoint me and in case of Greece, seem to be endless.

In the very end of the Cape, there is a church which in case of strong winds, you can use as a shelter. From the church I borrowed a couple of chairs in order to sit back and enjoy the sunset.

Cavo D'oro
Cavo D’oro

Next day we had scheduled to hike the ancient path to Archampolis which actually means ancient city and you can still see the ruins. There is no road access and one can hike or get there on boat.

====== Continue reading about Archampolis here =====

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